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best running shoes

Advice for choosing a good running shoe

The options that a runner may make with what athletic shoes to use can be important. Using the athletic shoes right has ramifications for how quick the athlete runs and can alter the probability for a running injury. There are, however, individuals who do disagree with this and there is certainly a great deal of dialogue about the concerns. There is some facts to back up both position of this dialogue, and not much general opinion and it depends on the way you choose to spin the data with regards to which side of the disagreement you want to believe in. The podiatry related live stream on Facebook, PodChatLive not too long ago reviewed this subject by interviewing Dr Chris Napier, Physical Therapist and Associate Professor from the University of British Columbia (and 2:33 marathon runner). PodChatLive is a monthly stream that goes out live on Facebook and after that transferred to YouTube after the live broadcast.

In this episode on athletic shoes, Chris talked about his new British Journal of Sports Medicine column which was relating to the logical misconceptions in the running shoe controversy. The PodChatLive hosts and Chris brought up just how runners (both uninjured and injured) ought to choose running shoes. They described exactly what the science does indeed actually tells us and just what it doesn’t yet show. Additionally they talked about how much focus and awareness running shoes seems to receive and questioned, might it be simply just all about comfort? Chris Napier is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at the University of British Columbia as well as an associate member of the Centre for Hip Health and Mobility. Chris Napier initially attained his Master of Physiotherapy degree in Perth in Australia, in 2003, and then his PhD at the UBC in 2018 on running biomechanics and injury. Since becoming a physical therapist, Chris has specialized his education with postgraduate research in manual therapy and also sport physical therapy.




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